Viola Davis Talks Childhood RACISM

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(Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)

(Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)

[photogallerylink id=100401 align=left]In an interview with Vogue Contributing Editor Andre Leon Talley, “The Help,” actress Viola Davis shared how she was able to relate to her role in the film. She explained how REAL and haunting discrimination was throughout her life.

Davis was born in South Carolina and raised in Rhode Island where she endured a scarring childhood. While talking to Talley, Davis revealed how she was spit on and chased with BRICKS.

“I have stories of being spit on… You have to realize I was in a predominantly white culture… And third grade was the worst because every day after school I would wait at the door and the bell would ring. And as soon as the bell rang I ran as fast as I could from the front door to my house, which was at least a mile away, because I would have eight to nine boys with sticks, bricks, anything they could find, who were ready to kill me… I finally told my mother… She said, ‘Viola, I want you to take my crochet and needle and you put it in your pocket and if they stop you again you tell them you’re gonna [stab] ‘em.'”

It only seems fit that she would play a role in the film, “The Help,” because of it’s theme and message. Her experience without a doubt contributed to her Actor In A Leading Role.”

Her emotional acceptance speech:

Sunni And The City

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