Music

Directors React To Jay-Z And Kanye West’s “No Church In The Wild” Video

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Kanye West / Jay Z

Kevin Winter, Getty Images

Molotov cocktails. Uprising. Elephants? Not the traditional images associated with Jay-Z and Kanye West, the dynamic duo known for promoting material excess and lyrical swag. Yet their video for “No Church In The Wild” offers a grim look at an unnamed rebellion, the kind seen in modern Greece, London, the Middle East and perhaps even in the U.S. The video quickly became a trending topic on Twitter Thursday, May 30, but fans weren’t the only ones caught up in the battle. Video directors also offered their thoughts on the epic clip.

Set in Prague, the Romain Gavras-directed video begins with a man holding a Molotov cocktail, which he ignites and throws at police, sparking the war. At first the protesters – armed only with sticks, rocks and determination – seem to be losing. But as the fight continues, the battle evens out. A man set aflame can be seen running through the streets. There are lasers, fireworks, and “the people” make a comeback. In the end, an elephant is curiously unleashed.

Gavras, who directed MIA’s “Born Free” video in 2010, is no stranger to building conflict into his work. “Born Free” imagines a world in which ginger children were rounded up and ushered into concentration camps. The controversial clip stirred audiences with a graphic image of an exploding child amidst a red-headed rebellion.

While Gavras has his own bloody video backstory, in rap video history “No Church”‘s depiction of an uprising echoes Nas‘ 2002 clip for “One Mic.” In Nas’ rebellion, an angry mob of courageous youth rages against the machine. Chris Robinson, who directed “One Mic,” offers a bit of insight into the mind of a director who has put together a scene such as this.

“As directors, we’re always inspired by different things,” Robinson told CBS Local. “I was trying to create a juxtaposition, saying we are all the same. Look at the struggle of these kids in Africa and these kids in Queensbridge. Look at the struggle with so-called authority and freedom. Freedom from poverty and tyranny. For me, it was that kind of moment.”

The most recent type of riot in a rap video comes from 2 Chainz. His video for “Riot,” directed by Decatur Dan, shows Molotov cocktails crashing into walls, and an angry mob armed with sticks, bats and chains. But where “No Church” was devoid of Jay-Z and Kanye, 2 Chainz took center stage in “Riot.”

The idea was not lost on Decatur Dan, who tweeted his discontent with the Romain’s riotous clip.

He went on to say: “‘Ye ran to Romain like you knew he would”

Unlike “Riot,” the song “No Church” doesn’t insist on one point. While Frank Ocean sets a somber tone on the chorus, Jay-Z’s verse offers some connection to the gritty feel of the visuals. Meanwhile, Kanye’s lyrics stand out as incongruous to the revolutionary theme.

“You will not control the threesome,” ‘Ye raps, “Just role the weed up until I get me some…/Thinking about the girl in all leopard / Who was rubbing the wood like Ke Ke Sheppard…”

“When I was watching it, I was wondering if they were going to switch it up during Kanye’s part,” said DC’s own Tabi Bonney, who has directed his own videos as well as Wale’s “My Sweetie.” “But they kept right with it. They obviously wanted to make a point which is relevant to today’s society. They didn’t want to tell the same story in the club that’s being told all the time.”

Chris Robinson, who has directed videos featuring West and several for Jay-Z, said Kanye also likes to artistically push the envelope.

“He doesn’t shoot the videos that you think might go along with the song,” Robinson said. “As a director, sometimes you gotta go left to make your point. But the hook to me is, the “wild” is not what you think it is, not the forest, not the woods, it’s the streets, it’s the world, people marching for Trayvon Martin. The big machine the little man is struggling against.”

Check out the clip for Nas’ “One Mic,” 2 Chainz’s “Riot,” and MIA’s “Born Free.”

-Erik Parker, CBS Local

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